Soins complexes à domicile pour enfants
https://complexcareathomeforchildren.com

Intermittent bladder catheterization

What is it?

How does it work?

FAQ – Intermittent bladder catheterization

When to consult your healthcare team

Urine

Catheterization

Mitrofanoff stoma

General state

When your child has any of the following symptoms or signs:

Do not hesitate to contact your healthcare team about any questions concerning your child.

PLEASE NOTE: The information in this section is meant as a general guide to help parents and caregivers with common issues and is not intended to replace the care provided by your child’s healthcare team.

Discuss your child’s unique needs with your healthcare team, including WHO and WHEN to contact when problems arise.

 

 

Urinary incontinence (leakage) between catheterizations

Possible cause(s)

  • Urinary tract infection
  • Catheterization not frequent enough
  • Malfunctioning Mitrofanoff valve

What to do?

  • Identify the time of the last catheterization.
  • Contact your healthcare team quickly.

The urine does not flow or flows more slowly than usual through the catheter

Possible cause(s)

  • Too frequent catheterization: therefore little urine in the bladder
  • Insufficient hydration
  • Inadequate functioning of kidneys
  • Mechanical blockage of the catheter (eg, kinked)
  • Catheter too small
  • Blockage of the Mitrofanoff stoma (eg, presence of mucus)
  • Poor technique

What to do?

  • Identify the time of the last catheterization.
  • Check how well your child is hydrated:
    • review the amount of liquid drunk by your child in the last 2 days,
    • look for the signs of dehydration: dry mouth and lips, sunken eyes, headache, weakness, dizziness.
  • Make sure the catheter is not stuck, bent or kinked.
  • Use a larger catheter after discussing it with your healthcare team.
  • Review the steps of catheterization and make sure to follow them well.
  • Contact your healthcare team quickly if the problem lasts for a longer period than what is agreed with your healthcare team.
  • Mitrofanoff: if your child has had surgery to enlarge the bladder, deposits can form and build up thus making the emptying difficult. To avoid this problem, the bladder must be irrigated regularly. Talk to your healthcare team.

The catheter is difficult to insert

Possible cause(s)

  • Resistance at the level of the sphincters
  • Mechanical blockage of the catheter (eg, kinked)
  • Mitrofanoff: injury at the level of the tunnel

What to do?

Natural ways: You may feel a slight resistance at the level of the urethral sphincter when trying to insert the catheter:

  • encourage your child to relax and breathe slowly,
  • roll the catheter itself with your fingers and push gently, but not forcefully,
  • ask your child to change position (eg, roll to the side).

If the resistance persists:

  • try a smaller catheter,
  • if this is not effective, remove the catheter to avoid hurting your child,
  • contact your healthcare team immediately.

Mitrofanoff:

  • follow the path of the canal between the stoma and the bladder with the catheter,
  • if there is some resistance at the entrance of the bladder proceed gently,
  • do not force the catheter in.

If the resistance persists:

  • remove the catheter,
  • contact your healthcare team immediately.

Urine has an unusual odor or is milky, not clear

Possible cause(s)

  • Urinary tract infection
  • Insufficient hydration
  • Bladder not completely emptied

What to do?

  • Make sure the bladder completely empties during catheterization.
  • If the problem is new, repeat the catheterization.
  • Check if your child has other symptoms that may indicate a urinary infection:
    • change in the color of urine
    • need to empty the bladder more often
    • pain in the urethra or abdomen
    • nausea, vomiting
    • fever: rectal  ≥ 38⁰C, oral or armpit ≥  37.5⁰C
    • chills
    • irritability
    • tiredness, lack of energy
  • If the problem persists after catheterization or if your child has other symptoms, quickly contact your healthcare team.

Bleeding after catheterization

Possible cause(s)

  • Irritation caused by frequent catheterizations
  • Urinary tract infection

What to do?

  • 1 or 2 small blood drops may be seen during catheterization: it is not worrying if it happens infrequently. Nevertheless, discuss it with your healthcare team.
  • If there is more bleeding or if it is more frequent:
    • check if your child has a fever (rectal ≥ 38⁰C or oral/armpit ≥ 37.5⁰C),
    • contact your healthcare team quickly.

Difficult catheter removal

Possible cause(s)

In rare cases, the catheter may have rolled up on itself

What to do?

  • Do not forcibly remove the catheter. Leave it in place.
  • Contact your healthcare team quickly.

Skin around the stoma of Mitrofanoff is: red swollen itchy, burns, or there are small bumps, abrasions or bleeding

Possible cause(s)

  • Skin irritation around the stoma
  • Infection of the skin around the stoma

What to do?

  • The skin around the stoma your child should have the same appearance as that of the rest of the belly.
  • Contact your healthcare team quickly.

Movement of the stoma of Mitrofanoff more than 0.5 cm from its usual position, whether sinking in or protruding out

Possible cause(s)

Various causes

What to do?

Contact your healthcare team immediately.

Abdominal discomfort; pain and/or burning at the meatus or urethra

Possible cause(s)

  • Urinary infection
  • Irritation

What to do?

Contact your healthcare team quickly.

Fever with or without malaise: ≥ 38⁰C rectal or ≥ 37.5⁰C oral/armpit

Possible cause(s)

  • Urinary infection
  • Other infection

What to do?

  • Record your childs other symptoms: pain, irritability, loss of appetite, fatigue, etc.
  • Contact your healthcare team quickly.

 

For specific advice on your child or any other questions, do not hesitate to contact your child’s healthcare team.



Everyday tips

Clothing

  • Choose clothes that will facilitate access to the genitals (vulva, penis) when there is a need to undress.
  • For independent children in wheelchairs, consider clothing with elastic or Velcro closures. Talk to your healthcare team for specific suggestions.
  • Children with a Mitrofanoff stoma should wear comfortable clothes that are not too tight. It is not necessary to cover the stoma with a bandage; urine should not leak from the stoma because of the valve.

Bathing and swimming

  • Clean your child’s genitals or the Mitrofanoff stoma every day, when bathing and showering, and before each catheterization. Your child should participate in this care, if able.
  • Use a washcloth, warm water and mild body soap, that is fragrance and additive free (eg, “Dove”).
  • Do not use antiseptic soap because it can irritate the skin and cause infection.
  • Girls: open the labia gently, clean the vulva, inner labia and the perineum to the anus (going from front to back); rinse with water in the same way.
  • Boys: clean the penis, including the area under the fold of the foreskin if uncircumcised; rinse with water.
  • Mitrofanoff stoma: gently wash the stoma and the skin around the stoma and rinse with water.
  • Baby wipes that are fragrance and additive free can be used, without rinsing, for cleaning or before catheterization.
  • Your child may take a bath, shower or swim without special care.

Sleeping

  • Consider meal times and your child’s need for hydration to determine, with your care team, if it is necessary to do catheterizations during the night.
  • For some children, wearing a diaper at night may help.

Nutrition and hydration

  • With your care team, determine the schedule of daily catheterizations for your child according to:
    • the organization of the activities planned for the day (eg, travel, school, medical care, social activities, sports),
    • the best length of time in between two catheterizations, considering the child’s comfort and the risks of urine flowing backwards into the kidneys.
  • Take note your child’s liquid intake and the amount of urine collected during the day, as recommended by your healthcare team.
  • Encourage your child to drink throughout the day; smaller amounts in the evening may allow for the child to not need catheterization during the night.

Activities

  • Your child can usually continue his regular daily activities.
  • It is recommended to do a catheterization immediately before play or engaging in a sport.
  • Follow the recommendations of your team which are tailored to the specific needs of your child.

Travel and transportation

Always carry a ”spare kit” in case a catheterization is needed outside the house:

  • hand soap
  • cleaning wipes
  • 2 clean catheters
  • water-based libricant
  • container to collect urine


Methods of care


Methods of care : Intermittent catheterization: boys

Indications

Frequency

Required materials

If needed:

Refer to your child’s healthcare team if the material or the sequence of steps you have been taught is different than those described.


Step 1: Anticipation

See the full description here

Summary:

Collaborate and form a team with your child. When you invest the time to form a strong team, children feel more comfortable and less anxious – this will help you complete the care with less stress – for you and your child.

Use these tips, from the start, to set the stage for a positive care procedure:

  • Create the right moment: integrate the care in a routine.
  • Alert your child to the needed care and communicate together.
  • Form a team with your child: Encourage autonomy by offering realistic choices such as the method of distraction. Stay tuned to your child. Manage pain and anxiety, using distraction and positioning for comfort.

Step 2: Preparation

See the full description here

Summary:

  • Prepare the environment: Identify a routine place for care. Close windows, doors and fans. Wash and dry the work surface and gather the needed materials for the care and to distract your child.
  • Prepare your child: Get help if needed. Position your child for comfort to receive the care and start to use the selected distraction method.
  • Prepare yourself: Find the right time when you are ready to provide the care safely. Review the list of care steps. Wash your hands.

Now that you are ready to start the care procedure, take the opportunity to encourage and praise your child.

Step 3: Procedure

See the full description here

Summary 3 key concepts:

  • Safety: Carefully follow the care practice steps as you have been taught.
  • Flexibility: Be ready to adjust according to your child’s reactions during the procedure. As needed, reposition or select an alternative distraction strategy. Follow your child’s pace and rhythm.
  • Collaboration: Reassure your child, verbally and non-verbally. Acknowledge your child’s emotions and reactions. Help your child differentiate between the different sensations during a procedure.

Step 4: Prepare the materials

  • If you need to measure the amount of urine, make sure the container to collect the urine is on a flat surface in front of your son, at a level below his bladder.
  • Open the new catheter wrapping or take the reusable catheter from its container without touching the end.
  • Put a small amount of water-based lubricant on the tip of the catheter. *DO NOT use any type of Vaseline petroleum jelly.
Why ?

This step is done to prepare for the procedure.

The lubricant permits smooth entry of the catheter.

Step 5: Position your son

  • Based on what has been agreed with your healthcare team, ask your child to try to urinate before catheterization, if possible.
  • Then place your child in one of the positions discussed with your healthcare team, according to comfort, age and ability to cooperate.
  • The changing table can be used for a baby.
  • As soon as he is able, sit him on the toilet seat.
  • If your son is older, he can stand up in front or on the side of the toilet.
Why ?

This step optimizes comfort and efficiency.

Step 6: Locate the urethral opening

  • With one hand, hold the penis under the glans loosely at a 90 degrees angle with the belly.
  • If necessary, retract the foreskin.
  • Hold the penis in this position for the procedure.
  • If your son catheterizes himself, he should do it the same way.
Why ?

This step facilitates the procedure.

Step 7: Clean the area around the urinary meatus, as needed

  • Wash the penis with warm water and mild soap, including the area under the fold of the foreskin (if not circumcised).
  • Rinse with warm water.
  • You can also use a baby wipe.
Why ?

This step is necessary to prevent infections.

Step 8: Insert the catheter

  • With your free hand, hold the catheter like a pencil: about 3-4 cm from the end that will be inserted.
  • Direct the other end of the catheter to the toilet, the towel or the container to collect urine if the amount of urine is to be measured.
  • Ask your child to take a deep breath and relax.
  • At the same time as he exhales, gently insert the catheter into the urethra through the urinary meatus.
  • When you feel resistance:
    • encourage your son to relax and breathe slowly,
    • move the penis towards the thighs,
    • roll the catheter with your fingers, and push gently, but not forcefully,
    • ask your son to change position (eg, roll to one side or sit up).
  • Insert the catheter until urine starts to flow.
  • If the resistance persists:
    • try a smaller catheter.
  • If the insertion remains impossible:
    • remove the catheter to avoid hurting your son,
    • contact your healthcare team immediately.
Why ?

This step is necessary to safely enter the bladder without irritation or injury.

Step 9: Empty the bladder

  • Hold the catheter in place and allow urine to flow into the towel, the toilet or container.
  • If necessary, press gently on the belly of your son to help empty the bladder completely.
Why ?

This step is necessary to make ensure the bladder is emptied.

Step 10: Remove the catheter

  • Slowly withdraw the catheter when the urine stops flowing.
  • While removing the catheter, stop each time that urine begins to flow again.
  • Remove the catheter then quickly place it on a clean surface.
  • Wipe the penis; there may be lubricating gel or urine in the catheter as it leaves the urethra.
Why ?

This step is necessary to make sure that the bladder is emptied.

Step 11: Clean and store the catheter

  • Follow the manufacturer’s and your healthcare team’s recommendations about maintenance and the frequency of re-using catheters at home.
  • If the catheter can be reused, it must be cleaned after each use:
    • inject soapy water (eg, hand soap or dish washing liquid) with a syringe into the catheter,
    • rinse with water until there is a clear return,
    • wipe the outside of the catheter with a clean towel,
    • dry the inside by injecting air using the syringe,
    • place the clean catheter in the clean and dry  container,
    • wash the catheter storage container at least once a week.
Why ?

This step is necessary to prevent infections.

Step 12: Measure and record the amount of urine collected, if necessary

According to the recommendations of your healthcare team:

  • pour the urine in the container provided for its measurement,
  • note the amount,
  • observe the color and appearance,
  • write the information on the tracking sheet.
Why ?

This step is necessary to monitor the functioning of the kidneys and bladder.

Step 13: Recovery

See the full description here

Summary:

The treatment is finished. Wash your hands again.

Be prepared to recognize the challenges faced and to provide positive feedback. Help your child recognize his/her strengths. Acknowledge the collaborative teamwork.

  • Listen to what your child says about the parts of the procedure that were difficult or painful.
  • Comfort your child and recognize your child’s collaboration with positive feedback.
  • Highlight your child’s  specific strengths that helped make the procedure positive.
  • Discuss with your child what might be done the same or differently the next time the care is needed.
  • Keep your promises if you have promised a reward, follow through.
  • Reward yourself too.
.Reviser : Ross .Version : 1.0

Methods of care : Intermittent catheterization: girls

Indications

Frequency

Required materials

If needed:

Refer to your child’s healthcare team if the material or the sequence of steps you have been taught is different than those described.


Step 1: Anticipation

See the full description here

Summary:

Collaborate and form a team with your child. When you invest the time to form a strong team, children feel more comfortable and less anxious – this will help you complete the care with less stress – for you and your child.

Use these tips, from the start, to set the stage for a positive care procedure:

  • Create the right moment: integrate the care in a routine.
  • Alert your child to the needed care and communicate together.
  • Form a team with your child: Encourage autonomy by offering realistic choices such as the method of distraction. Stay tuned to your child. Manage pain and anxiety, using distraction and positioning for comfort.

Step 2: Preparation

See the full description here

Summary:

  • Prepare the environment: Identify a routine place for care. Close windows, doors and fans. Wash and dry the work surface and gather the needed materials for the care and to distract your child.
  • Prepare your child: Get help if needed. Position your child for comfort to receive the care and start to use the selected distraction method.
  • Prepare yourself: Find the right time when you are ready to provide the care safely. Review the list of care steps. Wash your hands.

Now that you are ready to start the care procedure, take the opportunity to encourage and praise your child.

Step 3: Procedure

See the full description here

Summary 3 key concepts:

  • Safety: Carefully follow the care practice steps as you have been taught.
  • Flexibility: Be ready to adjust according to your child’s reactions during the procedure. As needed, reposition or select an alternative distraction strategy. Follow your child’s pace and rhythm.
  • Collaboration: Reassure your child, verbally and non-verbally. Acknowledge your child’s emotions and reactions. Help your child differentiate between the different sensations during a procedure.

Step 4: Prepare the materials

  • If you need to measure the amount of urine, make sure the container to collect the urine is on a flat surface in front of your daughter at a level below her bladder.
  • Open the new catheter wrapping or take the reusable catheter from storage without touching the end.
  • Put a small amount of water-based lubricant on the tip of the catheter. *DO NOT use any type of Vaseline petroleum jelly.
  • If your daughter is a teenager, the use of tap water may be sufficient to lubricate the catheter.
Why ?

This step is done to prepare for the procedure.

The lubricant permits smooth entry of the catheter.

Step 5: Position your daughter

  • Based on what has been agreed with your healthcare team, ask your child to try to urinate before catheterization, if possible.
  • Then place your daughter in one of the positions discussed with your healthcare team, according to comfort, age and ability to cooperate.
  • The changing table can be used for a baby.
  • As soon as she is able, sit her on the toilet seat.
  • If your daughter is older, she can stand up in front or on the side of the toilet with one foot on the toilet or on a small bench.
Why ?

This step optimizes comfort and efficiency.

Step 6: Locate the urethral opening

  • Spread and hold open the labia of the vulva with the index and middle finger of one hand.
  • Find the meatus which is located between the clitoris and the vaginal opening.
  • Hold the labia in this position for the procedure.
  • If your daughter does self-catheterization, use of a mirror may be helpful at the beginning to help her find her urinary meatus but she will learn with practice to locate it with touch alone.
Why ?

This step facilitates the procedure by identifying the meatus, the entry point for the catheter.

Step 7: Clean the area around the urinary meatus, as needed

  • Open the labia, wash the vulva, inner labia and the perineum to the anus (going from front to rear) with warm water and a mild soap.
  • Rinse with warm water in the same way.
  • You can also use a baby wipe.
Why ?

This step is necessary to prevent infections.

Step 8: Insert the catheter

  • With your free hand, hold the catheter like a pencil: about 3-4 cm from the end that will be inserted.
  • Direct the other end of the catheter to the toilet, the towel or the container to collect urine if the amount of urine is to be measured.
  • Ask your child to take a deep breath and relax.
  • At the same time as she exhales, gently slide the catheter into the urethra through the urinary meatus. If you insert the catheter by mistake into the vagina, leave it in place, take a new catheter and insert it through the urinary meatus which is just above the vaginal opening.
  • Insert the catheter until urine starts to flow.
  • Remove the first catheter from the vagina, if it was placed.
  • If there is resistance:
    • encourage your child to relax and breathe slowly,
    • roll the catheter with your fingers, and push gently, but not forcefully,
    • ask your daughter to change position (e.g., sit up or roll to one side).
  • If the resistance persists:
    • try a smaller catheter.
  • If the insertion remains impossible:
    • remove the catheter to avoid hurting your daughter,
    • call your health team immediately.
Why ?

This step is necessary to safely enter the bladder without irritation or injury.

Step 9: Empty the bladder

  • Hold the catheter in place and allow urine to flow into the towel, the toilet or container.
  • If necessary, press gently on the belly of your daughter to completely empty the bladder.
Why ?

This step is necessary to make ensure the bladder is adequately emptied.

Step 10: Remove the catheter

  • Slowly withdraw the catheter once the urine stops flowing.
  • While removing the catheter, stop each time that urine begins to flow again.
  • Remove the catheter then quickly place it on a clean surface.
  • Wipe the vulva; there may be lubricating gel or urine in the catheter as it leaves the urethra.
Why ?

This step is necessary to make sure that the bladder is adequately emptied.

Step 11: Clean and store the catheter

  • Follow the manufacturer’s and your healthcare team’s recommendations about maintenance and the frequency of re-using catheters at home.
  • If the catheter can be reused, it must be cleaned after each use:
    • inject soapy water (eg, hand soap or dish washing liquid) with a syringe into the catheter,
    • rinse with water until there is a clear return,
    • wipe the outside of the catheter with a clean towel,
    • dry the inside by injecting air using the syringe,
    • place the clean catheter in the dry and clean container,
    • wash the catheter storage container at least once a week.
Why ?

This step is necessary to prevent infections.

Step 12: Measure and record the amount of urine collected, if necessary

According to the recommendations of your healthcare team:

  • pour the urine in the container provided for its measurement,
  • note the amount,
  • observe the color and appearance,
  • write the information on the tracking sheet.
Why ?

This step is necessary to monitor the functioning of the kidneys and bladder.

Step 13: Recovery

See the full description here

Summary:

The treatment is finished. Wash your hands again.

Be prepared to recognize the challenges faced and to provide positive feedback. Help your child recognize his/her strengths. Acknowledge the collaborative teamwork.

  • Listen to what your child says about the parts of the procedure that were difficult or painful.
  • Comfort your child and recognize your child’s collaboration with positive feedback.
  • Highlight your child’s  specific strengths that helped make the procedure positive.
  • Discuss with your child what might be done the same or differently the next time the care is needed.
  • Keep your promises if you have promised a reward, follow through.
  • Reward yourself too.
.Reviser : Ross .Version : 1.0

Methods of care : Intermittent catheterization: Mitrofanoff

Indications

Frequency

Required materials

If needed:

Refer to your child’s healthcare team if the material or the sequence of steps you have been taught is different than those described.


Step 1: Anticipation

See the full description here

Summary:

Collaborate and form a team with your child. When you invest the time to form a strong team, children feel more comfortable and less anxious – this will help you complete the care with less stress – for you and your child.

Use these tips, from the start, to set the stage for a positive care procedure:

  • Create the right moment: integrate the care in a routine.
  • Alert your child to the needed care and communicate together.
  • Form a team with your child: Encourage autonomy by offering realistic choices such as the method of distraction. Stay tuned to your child. Manage pain and anxiety, using distraction and positioning for comfort.

Step 2: Preparation

See the full description here

Summary:

  • Prepare the environment: Identify a routine place for care. Close windows, doors and fans. Wash and dry the work surface and gather the needed materials for the care and to distract your child.
  • Prepare your child: Get help if needed. Position your child for comfort to receive the care and start to use the selected distraction method.
  • Prepare yourself: Find the right time when you are ready to provide the care safely. Review the list of care steps. Wash your hands.

Now that you are ready to start the care procedure, take the opportunity to encourage and praise your child.

Step 3: Procedure

See the full description here

Summary 3 key concepts:

  • Safety: Carefully follow the care practice steps as you have been taught.
  • Flexibility: Be ready to adjust according to your child’s reactions during the procedure. As needed, reposition or select an alternative distraction strategy. Follow your child’s pace and rhythm.
  • Collaboration: Reassure your child, verbally and non-verbally. Acknowledge your child’s emotions and reactions. Help your child differentiate between the different sensations during a procedure.

Step 4: Prepare the materials

  • If you need to measure the amount of urine, make sure the container to collect the urine is on a flat surface near your child at a level below the bladder.
  • Open the new catheter wrapping or take the reusable catheter from its container without touching the end.
  • Put a small amount of water-based lubricant on the tip of the catheter. DO NOT use any type of Vaseline petroleum jelly.
Why ?

This step is done to prepare for the procedure.

The lubricant permits smooth entry of the catheter.

Step 5: Position your child

  • Place your child in one of the positions discussed with your healthcare team, according to comfort, age and ability to cooperate.
  • The changing table can be used for a baby.
  • As soon as he is able, sit your child on the toilet seat.
  • If your child is older, he can stand up in front or on the side of the toilet.
Why ?

This step optimizes comfort and efficiency.

Step 6: Clean the stoma and the skin around the stoma

  • Loosen clothing around the stoma.
  • Gently wash the stoma and the skin around the stoma with warm water and a soap without perfume or additives.
  • You can also use a baby wipe.
Why ?

This step is necessary to prevent infections.

Step 7: Insert the catheter

  • Hold the catheter like a pencil: about 3-4 cm from the end that will be inserted.
  • Direct the other end of the catheter to the toilet, the towel or the container to collect urine if the amount of urine is to be measured.
  • Gently insert the catheter through the opening of the stoma and follow the path of the channel until urine flows from the bladder.
  • If there is some resistance to the entrance of the bladder, gently continue but do not use force to enter the catheter.

If the resistance persists:

  • remove the catheter,
  • immediately contact your healthcare team.
Why ?

This step is necessary to safely enter the bladder without irritation or injury.

Step 8: Empty the bladder

  • Hold the catheter in place and allow urine to flow into the towel, the toilet or container.
  • Pass the catheter around the base of the bladder by rolling it around between your fingers.
  • If necessary, press gently on the belly of your child to completely empty the bladder.
Why ?

This step is necessary to make ensure the bladder is emptied.

Step 9: Remove the catheter

  • Slowly withdraw the catheter when the urine stops flowing.
  • While removing the catheter, stop each time that urine begins to flow again.
  • Remove the catheter then quickly place it on a clean surface.
Why ?

This step is necessary to make ensure the bladder is emptied.

Step 10: Clean and store the catheter

  • Follow the manufacturer’s and your healthcare team’s recommendations about maintenance and the frequency of re-using catheters at home.
  • If the catheter can be reused, it must be cleaned after each use:
    • inject soapy water (eg, hand soap or dishwashing liquid) with a syringe into the catheter,
    • rinse with water until there is a clear return,
    • wipe the outside of the catheter with a clean towel,
    • dry the inside by injecting air using the syringe,
    • place the clean catheter in the clean and dry container,
    • wash the catheter storage container at least once a week.
Why ?

This step is necessary to prevent infections.

Step 11: Measure and record the amount of urine collected, if necessary

According to the recommendations of your healthcare team:

  • pour the urine in the container provided for its measurement,
  • note the amount,
  • observe the color and appearance,
  • write the information on the tracking sheet.
Why ?

This step is necessary to monitor the functioning of the kidneys and bladder.

Step 12: Recovery

See the full description here

Summary:

The treatment is finished. Wash your hands again.

Be prepared to recognize the challenges faced and to provide positive feedback. Help your child recognize his/her strengths. Acknowledge the collaborative teamwork.

  • Listen to what your child says about the parts of the procedure that were difficult or painful.
  • Comfort your child and recognize your child’s collaboration with positive feedback.
  • Highlight your child’s  specific strengths that helped make the procedure positive.
  • Discuss with your child what might be done the same or differently the next time the care is needed.
  • Keep your promises if you have promised a reward, follow through.
  • Reward yourself too.
.Reviser : Ross .Version : 1.0

https://complexcareathomeforchildren.com/intermittent-bladder-catheterization/

Disclaimer: As medical and technical knowledge is constantly changing, this information is provided to you for educational purposes only. The information provided on this website is strictly provided on an “as is” basis without warranty of any kind, whether express or implied and should not at any time be considered as a substitute for professional advice from your physician or other qualified healthcare professional.

A collaboration of clinical experts across Quebec has taken every care to ensure that the information contained in this document is accurate, complete, and reflective of evidence-based practices. However, “Complex care at home for children” collaboration cannot and does not assume any responsibility for application of the content of this document or for any information that may be present in the websites cited as a reference. These web sites are provided for informational purposes only and do not represent the collaboration endorsement of any companies or products. Always consult your child’s physician and/or a qualified healthcare professional to learn more about recommendations specific to your child’s health needs.

All rights reserved: No parts of this document can be reproduced or transmitted in either electronic or mechanical form, including photocopies, or informational stocking or recuperation systems, without the written permission, signed by the author (with the exception of brief citations used in literatures or discussion forums, and citing the authors and the sources).

Copyright © 2021 Soins Complexes. Tous droits réservés/All rights reserved.